REWrite - The Restaurant Equipment World Blog

New Expanded Hours of Operation at Restaurant Equipment World

February 4th, 2013 by REW Blog Team

In order to better serve the needs of our customers, we’ve expanded our phone / live chat hours of operation for our online store sales and customer service teams.  During the week, Restaurant Equipment World is now open 24 hours a day (with the exception of closing at 9pm on Friday).  This change allows us to offer personal service 7 days a week to our valued customers, with limited weekend hours.  We can be contacted at (800) 821-9153 toll-free or by dialing (407) 679-9004.  Both our USA and Dubai, UAE offices can be reached directly by dialing either of these numbers.  Customer inquiries received via e-mail will be responded to during this these times as well.

New Hours at Restaurant Equipment World Table

* This change was facilitated by the opening of our Dubai, UAE office.  We are not outsourcing calls to other companies.  Whether you call into our USA or Dubai, UAE (late evening / early morning) offices, you’ll always be speaking with a friendly and knowledgeable associate who is employed directly by Restaurant Equipment World.

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REW Visits Shipyard Brew Pub

January 23rd, 2013 by REW Blog Team

Located in Winter Park, FL, Shipyard Brew Pub will leave any beer connoisseur with a very satisfied palate. With its daily-changing beer menu, from their seasonal Pumpkin Head beer to their bacon infused beer, Shipyard will not leave you wanting. Aside from their microbrewery, Shipyard also brings a taste of New England to Central Florida. Main Lobster, Clam Chowder and a Raw Oyster bar are a few of the New England staples that you can find at Shipyard. Watch this video as Shipyard’s manager explains what sets this brew pub apart from the rest – and he’ll tell you a little about their Mug Club.

Shipyard Brew Pub is located at: 200 W Fairbanks Ave, Winter Park, FL 32789
http://www.shipyardwinterpark.com/
http://www.restaurantequipment.net/

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Food Safety Matters: Cambro’s StoreSafe Program

April 11th, 2012 by REW Blog Team

Argyle Campbell, president and CEO of Cambro, talks about Food Safety and Cambro’s StoreSafe® program.

Food safety is a primary concern for every foodservice professional. For more than 60 years, Cambro foodservice equipment and supplies have earned the trust and loyalty of customers and public health professionals alike because their products are designed with food safety in mind.
Cambro’s owner and CEO, Argyle Campbell shares his company’s focus on food safety.

 
 

Q: What is StoreSafe and how does it relate to Food Safety?

AC: StoreSafe is our commitment to food safety. It’s at the heart of everything we do—from product design and testing to manufacturing and educating our representatives and customers about safe handling practices. StoreSafe identifies Cambro products that help foodservice operators meet food safety guidelines. But it’s so much more than that. It’s also about safe materials. With so many imports available, our customers look to us for FDA-approved materials that are made in NSF-listed manufacturing facilities.

Q: What is your level of experience as it relates to food safety?

AC: First of all, let me clarify that we are not claiming to have the level of expertise of a health inspector, food scientist, or public health official. We understand intelligent product design and the correlation it has with food safety. So while we may not be food experts, we are experts in how our products help support food safety and we want to be as transparent as possible when it comes to this issue.

Q: Do you feel operators and consumers are more concerned about food safety now than in past years?

AC: Yes. Consumers and operators are forgiving of many things. One thing they are not forgiving of is food safety issues. We understand that when a foodservice operator uses our products, they trust them to perform. That trust is based on consistent performance over the years.

Q: What key message do you want the audience to walk away with?

AC: Food safety is first and foremost about protecting lives, but it also is about protecting your brand. Food safety never takes a day off. If you are dealing with a food safety issue, it’s already too late. The whole basis of StoreSafe is to try and look at the food safety issue from a proactive standpoint, and not just a reactive standpoint. It’s doing the right thing, not only for the customer, but also doing the right thing for your brand.
 
 
 
 
From our friends at Cambro Manufacturing.

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Everything You’ve Wanted To Know About Coffee… And Then Some

January 6th, 2012 by REW Blog Team

If your restaurant serves breakfast, you probably serve coffee as well. But have you really thought about what goes into that little caffeinated (or decaf) cup of goodness? What happens between water and coffee?

Many times, it can be easy to overlook this part of your menu – you put the pre-packaged Folger’s in the brewer, pour in some water, press a button, and voila – your customers get their daily dose. But what makes some people go to Starbuck’s and spend maybe twice as much to get their coffee over yours? It’s about time you make your coffee so good it becomes your customers’ favorite morning ritual.

But how?

Before we can talk about how to make it better, we should first discuss the basics of how it’s made. The first thing to note is that the coffee “bean” isn’t really a bean at all – it’s actually a roasted seed from the coffee plant. The seed is picked when it is inside the coffee plant’s cherry. To add to the confusion, the “cherry” isn’t a cherry at all, but a drupe – a more generalized description of a fleshy fruit with a pit. We’re not botanists, so from here on out we’ll simply refer to it by the misnomer we all know and love – “coffee bean.”

There’s literally hundreds of species of coffee plants, each with it’s own flavor. The plants take four or five years to mature, and then will produce a harvest for fifty or sixty years thereafter. Once the plant is grown, and once the 9 month ripening period is over, the fruit from the coffee plant is picked – usually by hand. Once picked, they are dried, and the outer layer is separated from the seed. The coffee is shipped unroasted – this is known as green coffee.

As a restaurant owner, all of this matters in regards to how the coffee you serve your customers tastes. Because of differences in soils and water cycles, coffees from different regions taste different: the Americas provide a crisp taste, the African coffees are often more acidic with a lingering aftertaste, and Indonesian coffee tends to be bolder. For mornings, American coffees are a crowd-pleaser – strong enough to wake you up, but not so strong that it’s considered a dessert coffee.

Once the coffee has been picked, stripped, and shipped, it needs to be roasted. Roasting is an art and a science, with the temperature and length of time changing depending on what type of result is desired – stronger coffee requires a darker roast and longer heating time, lighter coffees require a lighter roast and shorter heating time. After roasting, the beans take on the familiar dark color, and the roasting brings out the natural flavor so it can be transferred during the coffee making process.

Restaurants generally serve a medium roast coffee in the mornings, splitting the difference for patrons. To stand out from the crowd, it may be a good idea to offer both a dark and a light roast, or to offer a medium roast all the time (a “house” coffee) and a different specialty coffee or roast every day or week.

Once roasted, coffee is ready for grinding. Many restaurants, perhaps yours included, leave this to the experts, and buy coffee in already-ground form. Once you expose ground coffee to air, it starts losing it’s flavor, leaving you with blander coffee later in the week than at the beginning. Some coffee connoisseurs turn their nose even at the least offensive pre-ground option, which is vaccuum-sealed single-serving packages. Even though no air can reach the contents, and they don’t lose their flavor over time, there still may be a legitimate reason for this abhorrence.

When you grind your own coffee, the dust that is created doesn’t stay in the grinder; it floats throughout your establishment, creating a distinct and delicious smell – one that is oft-loved even by non-coffee drinkers. This alone may be a good reason to grind your own coffee. Besides this, however, fresh-ground coffee does just taste better, and you have more control over how it is ground. There are probably entire books devoted to how to make the daily grind, but for simplicity’s sake, we’ll just note that grinds go from coarse to fine. Coarsely ground coffee is used for specialty brewers like the French press or even more exotic Toddy cold-brew method. Finely ground coffee is used for espressos and other specialty brewers like the AeroPress. Since you are more than likely using a conventional drip-coffee brewer, a medium grind works best.

So now that you have your coffee ground, just throw it in the coffee maker with a filter and some water, and you’re good to go, right? Almost.

First, if you still use paper filters, it may be time to make the switch to a non-disposable filter, usually made out of fine metal or plastic mesh. Paper filters absorb coffee oils, removing some taste from the final result. Not that much, mind you, but if you are looking to serve your customers the best, it’s something to consider. Also, you’ll be cutting down on costs in the long run, as well as keeping filters out of the landfill.

Secondly, since black coffee consists of 99% water (shocking, I know), it’s important to know what’s going into it. The difference between filtered water and regular water is night and day, so you can imagine what happens to the coffee when you put hard water that smells like eggs in your brewer – not good. So, get a water filter; if you are a low-volume coffee-serving operation, Brita will work, for larger volumes, a dedicated in-line water filter will be best. Trust me, your customers will thank you.

That about covers the basics. Feel free to send us a Tweet if you liked this article or learned something from it, and if you want to purchase a coffee machine from us, visit www.coffeemakerworld.com. A new coffee machine, with the aforementioned tips, may just be the ticket to getting a boost in your early-morning traffic.

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The Perfect French Fries- Finding the Balance

July 22nd, 2011 by REW Blog Team

Not sure if that’s your restaurant…or some other guy who has the same fries.

Everybody’s got their own idea about who makes the perfect french fry, and they often subscribe to one large chain or another when arguing about it. If you run into anybody who doesn’t have an opinion about how they prefer their fried potato slices, start running the other way. They are not human.

Fries are a staple for many restaurants, and you currently have them on your menu, it may be a good idea to try to encroach on the mega-chains ground when your customers start arguing with their friends about the subtleties of sea salt and crispiness. Maybe you already make world-renowned fries, and if that’s the case, feel free to stop reading. However, if you are just slicing up potatoes, throwing ’em in the frier, and tossing salt on them, or if you are buying frozen bags of them from a supplier, we think there are better options.

First of all, if you get frozen fries from a supplier, you are on the right track. As we tweeted earlier, this guy knows the secret of the perfect fry – the freezer. Breaking down the internal structure of the fry reduces the starchiness and creates a soft-n’-steamy interior for your customer’s enjoyment. However, getting those supplier fries means that customer’s may have had your fries a thousand times before at any number of surrounding restaurants. The more original, delicious cuisine you have, the more chance that a customer will remember you next time for dinner. You’re goal is this: the next time an argument about fries comes up (as they often do), you want your customer to be an ambassador for your establishment.

While there are many recipes online that inform you of the perfect fry, you’ll really have to experiment on your own to find some that compliment your existing menu and speak to your customer’s palate. Don’t be too shy, either. While steak with steak fries may be a perennial favorite, you could always try heavily salted string fries instead, or as an addition to your existing menu. You may be surprised at the number of customers who prefer one over the other, and in addition, you can bet there will be a conversation about it at the table if both are ordered.

However, the buck doesn’t stop at the size of the fry or amount of salt. Seasonings, such as chili powder or dry ranch, can liven up a menu. If you aren’t sure of which fry your customer’s enjoy the most, offer a fry-trio appetizer for a limited time. Plate three of your favorite variations as a single appetizer, then judge customer reactions and keep track of which variations are left on the plate after the meal. As long as all three are sufficiently tasty (so you don’t get any nasty remarks about the fries that don’t pull their weight), and sufficiently varied (so they don’t confuse which fry is which), this is a great way to give your customer’s the ultimate decision in what lands on your long-term menu.

Don’t let your fries languish to the side; make them just one more reason customer’s want to choose you for lunch or dinner.

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